Tag Archives: Epic fantasy

Keeping Track with Collateral

Good ideas come to me slowly, I admit that. Sometimes I’m staring one right in the face and nothing happens. I can use my writing, and my lovely wife as examples.

As to the latter, this was literally true. I met Dorie trying out for a play (she was musical director, so I got used to not being in charge right away and couldn’t have been happier). But mid-thirties, the usual folderol about marriage in the modern age. I was looking right at her (and believe me, when she got dressed up to play a show it was impossible to look anywhere else) for more than two years before I asked her to marry me. I made up for it by marrying her twice, and this should all be part of another tale, so for now just understand. Great idea. Took me awhile.

So this lovely wife of mine, she read one of my books a few months ago, the first one in the Shards of Light series (The Ring and the Flag). And she liked it. This was an accomplishment on several levels, but just get this one for now– Dorie is very busy. And I think she’s like a lot of readers today, there is just so little time to sit and read, even novellas like my series. I do some tooth-grinding and jaw-gnashing over that because I realized this problem, that epic fantasy books are way-long and readers don’t have time, so I thought I’d solve that problem by, duh, writing shorter tales. That plugged together.

No, the good idea wasn’t about writing a series. That’s everybody’s deal nowadays. And my series, compared to mystery or romance or pretty much any other genre, is stuck in low gear. I have three novellas done in the SoL series, and am working on the finale now. Not ten books, not fourt-frickin’-teen, not a goes-on-forever-if-you-like-Mr.-Big-Publisher-Guy. Four. And then we’ll see, but more likely than not pretty much done. In epic, stuff has to have meaning, come around; there’s a home-run at the end, but it’s a LONG at-bat, capeesh?

But my lovely wife, who like you has no time, kept lodging the same comment, about the first book and now about the second which I forced on her immediately.

“I have to keep turning back to remember who the characters are.”

Again, duh, why couldn’t I put these things together? Because slow, remember?

So the reissued Shards of Light books now have glossaries in the front. Good idea.

But I looked at my lovely wife, stuck on page 17 of Fencing Reputation for, like, ever. The old version, with no glossary. And I hated that. So I finally had another good idea.

I made a little book-mark glossary. See?

Don’t worry about reading the names, just go with me here. This is something that will hassle ALL my books, right? Lots of characters, book gets partially read then collects dust. So cast of characters in the front from now on, sure. But what about making book-marks with the same info?

Tell me what you think: good collateral, really make a difference? Or is epic just a hopeless case in the instant-replay world?

Put out character-cast bookmarks for each title in the Lands of Hope series? Give one with each copy sold in person, and maybe send a whole set to any reader for the cost of the postage?

VOTE IN THE COMMENTS BELOW. (It’s one letter, you can do this.)

a) Great idea, would make me want to read the one I’ve got or buy the next one.

b) Cute idea, not sure it would really help.

Almost forgot! New cover for Fencing Reputation coming out soon! How do you like that too!

I-Do Review: The Plane of Dreams

Indies need the job done right.

So, who else is going to do it!

People say they love the tales, but for various reasons, they don’t wish to review. Fine then. I’ve helped with cover design, proofed, passed on edits, used social media and handed out book cards. Why not this? So my One-Word Wrap-Up and the Short Summary will give you undecided readers the quick peek you’ve needed. More detail if you want it, and links to other themes and ideas because I can!

I hear you, dog in the fight, but don’t worry. I’ve got the Maybe Not section in each; painful as they will be to write, I promise to give you the downside of the book I review as well.

No further ado, the I-Do Review for

The Plane of DreamsĀ  plane_of_dreams_rm

One-Word Wrap-Up: Faithful

Short Summary: Heroes Galore, Most Peril Possible

One of the biggest adventuring groups ever chronicled in fantasy hangs together, just barely, and deflects a threat not only to their lives or the kingdom, but the entire waking world. I mean without them, YOU would probably never sleep again.

More, There’s Always More:

(BTW, that line is first quoted in this book, though it’s always true!)

So I said ‘biggest’, and the number you’re looking for is eleven. Nearly a dozen heroic characters who get detailed attention, and who have a substantial impact on the plot. The adventuring band comes to be known as the Tributarians, a name given them by an enemy. Some you’ve already seen, by which I mean quite literally I’ve shown them to you:
qerlak2Qerlak Barleybane, third son of an Argensian noble who cannot inherit, adventures with the commoners and falls into enough treasure to afford enchanted armor and the downpayment on a foef of his own. The young Pious Warrior thinks he is retiring from the group at the very beginning of the tale.

Gelethiel Nomenseer, human Mage whose as-yet untold encounters on the Shimmering Mindsea drew her to the study of dreams. This seeming eccentricity turns out

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to have a major impact, as the title of the tale indicates! She goes with Qerlak to his foef, thinking as he does that they will no longer have to risk their lives in remote places.

Others of the group have only been referenced in passing, as with Meandar, the Stealthic who seldom appears, but is always there throughout the book. I can say no more, but the villain in this case is also the hero. Another protag guest-starred as an example, namely the incredible strength and stamina of the warrior Spitz in my calculations on hauling a golden skeleton-statue.

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Two heroes have lesser mentions, though not smaller contributions. Engurra the martial wizard is almost spooky quiet, competent and calm, yet captures the albino animal-handler Petekris El. One of my favorite chapters is told from the point of view of the magic-jack, the Halfling Trillien, who quietly turns the tide against the Scarlet Contra single-handed.

This leaves a set of four directly in the midst of the plot, the quartet who between them lead the Tributarians if anyone does. In no particular order, Sallinj’r the Elven Bard, Cheriatte the Elven Preacher, Zoanstahr the human Mage and Solo the Dwarven Pious Warrior are the most experienced and driven heroes of the group. The tension and enduring friendship they display is at the heart of the tale.

Still two left! But they need less introduction to anyone familiar with the Lands, especially mon-crulbagh-detnow that other tales have published. The Plane of Dreams was the first complete Tale of Hope I ever drafted; its events took place in the year 2001 ADR but I set it aside for a trio of shorter works before I published it: one of those was the sword-and-sorcery novelette Three Minutes to Midnight, set back in 1992 ADR and featuring the legendary Stealthic Trekelny. After next publishing PoD, I turned back in time again to the year 1995 ADR for Judgement’s Tale and its sequel The Eye of Kog, where one of the great heroes of this or any other saga was introduced in the Woodsman Treaman. These two veteran adventurers rounded out the Tributarian roster, one by joining and another by leaving (or so he thought), near the beginning of the tale.

barleybane_crestThat’s only the heroes mind you. Minor and supporting characters include a captain of the city guards who stars in a couple of chapters; previous lords of Qerlak’s new keep in Mon-Crulbagh, who have taken note in the castle journal of certain menacing events that inform the newest tenant; various regulars in the tavern who are absolutely certain what’s going on (and in fact have not the slightest clue); a beleaguered castellan, paranoid merchant, pet panther, and three haply-met youths taking their first steps down the adventuring path and skirt the edge of the plot (but will later come into their own in the novel The Test of Fire). Don’t get me started on the villains.

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And BTW? The Man in Grey.

Maybe Not: Reasons you Might Pass

When I said the one word for this novel was “faithful” this is where it could leave some readers behind. If it does, the words they will use include “uneven”, “disorienting” and maybe just “too long”. This is the novel that the pros would look at and immediately declare, there must be five fewer hero-characters, maximum three supporting names, and combine at least the two major villains into one. Then cut 20k words and it’ll be fine.

pete-closeNot happening. Death before dishonor. I am a Chronicler and these are the people who were there. There are indeed many points-of-view you need to be in on to understand the tale. Lord of the Rings started with nine, but never took solo PoV when you think about it (Tolkien was firmly rooted in omniscient third-person).

If you don’t like getting clues from centuries-old wine-stained writings or a blood-spattered letter, watching a fight through a panther’s eyes, or following people into their dreams (the title, duh!) then this tale could really frustrate you. But that is what happened, and I exerted my utmost skill, not to dazzle or educate, but to remain faithful. I invite you to judge on that basis.

The Plane of Dreams is available at Amazon in e-book and now paper formats.